Toronto BrickWorks

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Looks like an array of kilns.

The Don Valley Brickworks is a former quarry and industrial site located in the Don River valley in Toronto, Ontario. Currently the buildings sit mostly unused while the quarry has been converted into a city park which includes a series of naturalized ponds. The Don Valley Brick Works operated for nearly 100 years and provided bricks used to construct many well-known Toronto landmarks, such as Casa Loma, Osgoode Hall, Massey Hall, and the Ontario Legislature. The buildings are currently undergoing restoration, courtesy of Evergreen, a national charity dedicated to restoring nature in urban environments. (Wikipedia)

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Someone made an artificial little pond and setup a canoe in it. Probably abandoned after the photo shoot.

Brick Works Factory is off-limits and there is a barrier around it. But people have creative ways to enter it and the guards don’t seem to care. Afterall what would a couple of guys with cameras do inside an abandoned structure?

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Switchboard. Reminds me of my engineering days!

My photographer friend wanted to go here and I tagged along. He was surprised and I was disappointed to find half a dozen people in that place already. Some were busy in photo shoots with models.

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Holes in broken walls offer pretty views.

I can’t read Graffiti. The words usually don’t make any sense. Feels like a whole different language :)

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Art supplies. The whole place is covered in Graffiti.

There are several ‘secret’ passages that open to new rooms. Although its nice to explore and take pictures, 15 years ago I would have loved to play detective and investigate here!

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Some more machines.

This place must have been pretty busy judging by the size of it and the sheer number of kilns it had. A non-profit called Evergreen has plans to develop the abandoned buildings into a cultural centre with a focus on the environment. I’m not a big fan of such fancy “cultural centers.”

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The big warehouse, probably used for raw material storage.

I’m fascinated by Sun rays and dust that sparkles in the Sun. So simple but beautiful. My friend kicked up some dust so that this picture will make more sense.

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Area outside the kilns and heavenly intervention.

Tip: If you click on the images, the bigger versions that open are clearer than the pictures posted above. I think I used the wrong algorithm to resize :(

9 thoughts on “Toronto BrickWorks

  1. Hi Priyank!
    Amazing post!
    I’ll finally get some days off this year; not much, just from Friday night (September 5th) through Monday morning (September 15th). But I don’t leave you empty hands: a beautiful beach and lots of champagne wait for you at Blogtrotter. Enjoy!

  2. I thought the switchboard a design and said this is so pretty only later when I come back to read the captions, I felt foolish “O a switchboard …I thought…” and I looked again…so I decided that its a switchboard design . but is it really a real switch board? or a painting or a wall? it kind of looks ‘put together by design’ if u know what I mean, neat, rythm, symmetry…and ur pictures dnt blow on my comp so cdnt see…if theres an orig wh shows what it really is post a copy pl thx

  3. Trisha:
    Okay I will fix the code :)

    It is a real switchboard. Switchboards are always arranged like that. This one in particular has so much graffiti, probably that’s what playing a game on your eyes :) Try clicking the pic again, or see the photo gallery, it should open to a bigger image.

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